Poll: 94% so far believe basic firearms safety training should be taught in public schools

Although there is no way of knowing for certain, it is believed that from 60-90 percent of homes in Montana have firearms. The likelihood that a child will at some point come in contact with a gun is very high. Should children be taught in schools about basic firearms safety, whether they have guns in their homes or not? At what age should we begin teaching our kids about gun safety? Take the polls, comment and share below.

Fundamental firearms safety training should be taught in Montana public schools.
At what age do you believe basic firearms safety training in Montana should begin?

Daily Show Skewers & Ridicules Helena, Montana’s March For Our Guns Rally & Activists [Video]

Comedy Central’s Daily Show Makes Montana gun owners look like a bunch of morons at the recent pro-gun rally in Helena. This should surely make you want to come around to their gun control way of thinking, right? Watch the video, skewer them and share below.

Helena, Montana’s National Center for Unwanted Firearms takes gun donations [Video]

 
KTVH – Helena’s National Center for Unwanted Firearms takes gun donations

“Over the weekend the new Helena based non-profit The National Center for Unwanted Firearms participated in the March For Our Lives rally in Washington D.C.

“We’re a non-political organization, we don’t take sides. Obviously I’m pro-gun, I made a career out of it,” said Bruce Seiler, co-founder The National Center for Unwanted Firearms.

The idea for The National Center for Unwanted Firearms started back in 2009, but it wasn’t until last year organization became official.

Bruce Seiler and Chip Ayers are the co-founders. Combined they have 80 years of experience working with firearms, and have created a new non-profit organization, to help take unwanted guns off the streets.

Both worked for the U.S. Secret Service, Seiler was an Armorer/Ordinance Specialist.

“So who better than I to know what’s junk and what’s not, and what’s worth keeping, so rather than some legislature make that decision, we thought we would accept some responsibility as a manufacturer, and start a non-profit that helps dispose of firearms and be a junkyard for firearms in America,” said Seiler.

People can submit a gun and choose to have it sold or destroyed.

If the gun has historical value, they’ll help it find its way to a museum.

“I think about all the issues and all the manufacturers I dealt with and the firearms industry, they are making them, but who is getting rid of them? And we don’t want them to fall in the wrong hands,” said Seiler.

In some cases, the guns they receive may be made available to law enforcement for training.

Another part of the mission of The National Center for Unwanted Firearms is to promote gun safety in the home.

“We have a state that is unique, because we have Senators and Congressmen that are aware of the hunting and firearms. We don’t look at firearms in Montana the way they do in the inner cities. I was 9 when I had my first firearm, my father was an Ordinance Colonel,” said Seiler.

Seiler said back in his time people valued guns differently.

“And we had responsibility. Now they can fall into the wrong hands, times have changed,” said Seiler.

Seiler tells us they will also offer consultation to collectors on the safest way sell to firearms.

They recently advised a Washington D.C. man with over 200 guns to use a federal firearms license. It was to help transfer the guns to avoid liability, should the guns fall into the wrong hands.

You can sell or donate firearms here, or call (833) 448-4867.”

And in PA: Students Are Armed with Rocks In Case of a School Shooting [Video]

 
WNEP – SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, Pa. — “There’s a rocky controversy when it comes to school safety in Schuylkill County.

The superintendent of the Blue Mountain School District is in the spotlight after telling lawmakers in Harrisburg his students protect themselves against potential school shooters with rocks.

“Every classroom has been equipped with a five-gallon bucket of river stone. If an armed intruder attempts to gain entrance into any of our classrooms, they will face a classroom full students armed with rocks and they will be stoned,” said Dr. David Helsel.

That was Dr. Helsel testifying to the House Education Committee last week in Harrisburg.

The superintendent of the Blue Mountain School District was explaining his unconventional form of protecting the students in their schools in the event of an active shooter situation: give them rocks.

“At one time I just had the idea of river stone, they`re the right size for hands, you can throw them very hard and they will create or cause pain, which can distract,” said Helsel.

Helsel says teachers, staff and students were given active shooter training through a program known as ALICE which stands for Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate and they routinely hold evacuation drills for active shooter simulations.

But if a teacher decides to lockdown a classroom, there are rocks in a five-gallon bucket kept in every classroom closet that students could throw if shooters get inside.

Still, Helsel says the rocks are seen as a last resort.

“We have devices installed in our doors that help to secure them, to make it very difficult to break through,” said Helsel. “We also have, we train kids and talk about barricading the doors.”

A teenager who is a senior a Blue Mountain High School and says he and other students like that plan.

“It matters because it will help protect the schools, anything helps, rocks are better than books and pencils.”

Parents do as well.

“At this point, we have to get creative, we have to protect our kids first and foremost, throwing rocks, it’s an option,” said Dori Bornstein.

But not everyone thinks this is a practical line of defense.

“I think that’s rather comical,” said one college student in Schuylkill Haven.

“It’s absurd, arm the teachers,” said a parent in Schuylkill Haven.

Helsel says the district has no plans to arm teachers, however, Blue Mountain does have a maintenance employee who is trained and certified to work as school security and is armed.

And the district plans to have more support staff get the same training to act a security.”