Medical marijuana providers, patients raise concerns about proposed Montana regulations

“The rules the agency proposed would raise the price of a medical marijuana card from $5 to $30. The fee for a provider license would increase from $50 to $1,000 for those with ten patients or fewer and $5,000 for those with more. There would be additional charges for things like opening a dispensary or producing marijuana concentrates.” Read more, share and comment below.

Medical marijuana providers, patients raise concerns about proposed Montana regulations

Medical marijuana patients and providers from around Montana came to Helena Thursday to raise concerns about proposed new regulations for their industry. More than 100 people attended a public hearing on the proposed rules at the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services offices.

Helena City Commission Wants Men in Your Daughters Restroom & Locker Room

“While the Helena City Commission will oppose a proposed ballot initiative that would require people to use the bathroom designated for their sex at birth, commissioners haven’t yet decided how that dissent will play out.” More below…

Helena City Commission opposes proposed restrictions on transgender bathroom use

While the Helena City Commission will oppose a proposed ballot initiative that would require people to use the bathroom designated for their sex at birth, commissioners haven’t yet decided how that dissent will play out. Missoula and Bozeman have both expressed their dissent by joining a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, which is challenging the constitutionality of the Montana Locker Room Initiative.

“Missoula and Bozeman have both expressed their dissent by joining a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, which is challenging the constitutionality of the Montana Locker Room Initiative. The Montana League of Cities and Towns is considering whether to file a separate lawsuit of its own, according to Executive Director Tim Burton.

Though members of Helena’s commission came to a consensus Wednesday to oppose the initiative, they want to consider partnering with other entities before joining the ACLU.

The ACLU said the ballot initiative targets people who are transgender and would not allow people to use the bathroom corresponding to their gender identity. The lawsuit asks the court to rule the initiative unconstitutional and prevent it from being on the 2018 ballot.

The ballot initiative was proposed by the Montana Family Foundation, a conservative advocacy group based in Laurel. A similar measure the foundation supported was rejected by the Montana Legislature this session.

Jeff Laszloffy, President of the Montana Family Foundation, released a statement after the ACLU filed the suit.

“High school girls shouldn’t be forced to shower in front of a boy, even if he does think he’s a girl. Boys shouldn’t have to change clothes in front of a girl, even if she thinks she’s a boy. It’s just common sense. It’s tragic that the ACLU wants to disenfranchise thousands of Montana voters,” he said.

A representative of ACLU of Montana attended the city commission meeting on Wednesday, but the discussion on whether to join the group’s lawsuit was brief. Commissioner Andres Haladay said the city attorney will draft a proposed resolution appointing the ACLU as special counsel, though that doesn’t necessarily mean the commission will approve it.

“It’s not because the commission has decided to go that way. The only way the commission can vote is by resolution,” Haladay said. “In that intervening period, the city will be able to explore any other options.”

Haladay was unsure when the resolution would go to the commission for a vote, but he said the public would have a chance to comment at the meeting.

Helena Commissioner Dan Ellison said he was concerned about joining the ACLU lawsuit due to potential future conflicts. He said the city has a good relationship with the ACLU, but the two groups have disagreed on policies before. He said he’s worried that working relationship might be jeopardized if the city of Helena joins the lawsuit.

SK Rossi, who attended the meeting on behalf of the ACLU, said there would only be a conflict if the ACLU wanted to file suit against the city while the lawsuit is still in play.

Ellison said there could be other options to oppose the initiative, like the potential lawsuit by the Montana League of Cities and Towns.

Language in the initiative said it could cost cities and towns in Montana nearly $550,000 in the first four years.

“Long-term costs and legal fees for state and local governments, K-12 schools, and universities could be substantial, but are uncertain,” the initiative says.” Source: Helena Independent Record

Montanans get another year to use state IDs to board flights

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Montanans get another year to use state IDs to board flights

Montana will have another year to comply with the federal Real ID Act, which means Montanans can continue to use their state-issued driver’s license to board flights and access federal buildings. The Montana Legislature passed a law this session allowing the state to comply with the 2005 act, which requires a more strict identification process to board flights and access certain facilities.

Montana will have another year to comply with the federal Real ID Act.

The state Legislature passed a bill this session allowing the state to comply with the act, which requires a more strict identification process to board an airplane. Montana asked for another extension and was waiting to hear back from the Department of Homeland Security ahead of an Oct. 10 deadline. Eric Sell, a spokesperson for the Department of Justice, said the department received an email granting an extension on Wednesday morning.

The extension will allow Montanans to continue accessing a military base and most federal facilities. People will also be able to board planes with their Montana driver’s license.

The Motor Vehicle Division will start offering compliant IDs in January of 2019, Administrator Sarah Garcia said. During the year period, the division will hire new staff, buy necessary equipment and develop their business process. Garcia said the state will file for a final extension period to get through January 2019, even though the state has a 90 day grace period once the extension expires in October 2018.

During a renewal period, a non-compliant ID will still cost $40.50. During the renewal period, a Real ID card will cost an additional $25. People will pay an additional $50 during a non-renewal period. Montanans will also be able to use a passport to board planes.

Now, Garcia said the Motor Vehicle Division will partner with marketing students at Montana State University Billings to create a public information campaign. The division will pay for al the materials and advertising, but MSUB has agreed to develop the campaign for free.

Department of Justice wasn’t available to immediately answer questions, but previously said it would start a public awareness campaign if the extension was granted. Signs have been up in airports telling Montanans they won’t be able to use their driver’s license to board a plan starting January 2018. The campaign will notify people of the extension and inform them on the department’s efforts to comply.

Signs at the airport that said Montanans won’t be able to board a plane with their driver’s license as of January 2018 will have to be updated by TSA, Garcia said.